Conflicts and Resolution

All conflicts are essentially the same.

Conflict Maps

  • Roll initiative: Each character in the conflict rolls Alertness (for Physical, Access, Race, and Repair conflicts) or Empathy (for Social and Research conflicts). Record scores, and the character
Possible Actions:
  • Attack: Attacker uses one of the Attack Skills to deal Stress damage to a defender. Resisted with Defensive Skills.
    • Player declares a target character.
    • Player rolls an Attack Skill, modified by range. Reduce shifts by one for each zone between the attacker and defender (Firearms, Might, Unarmed, and Weapons have a Range of 0 and may not function outside their Range. Certain Gear may increase effective Range).
    • If the attacker has shifts, the defender’s Stress Track (Health or Composure) is marked at the box indicated (one shift marks the first box, two shifts marks the second, and so on). A Weapon’s Accuracy and Damage values may affect the Stress damage.
    • Hits may be mitigated by consequences.
    • If the attacker fails their roll by three or more (gets three or more negative shifts), the defender gets Spin.
  • Move Self: Player uses one of the Move Skills to move self a number of Zones equal to your shifts of success. Usually not resisted, but the player must expend shifts on any borders.
  • Block: Use one of the Defensive Skills to prevent a specific action, or reinforce a Border.
    • Player determines what action they wish to prevent – stopping an opponent from moving out of a Zone, firing their weapon, or attacking a specific ally.
    • Player rolls a Defensive Skill and notes the result.
    • If any opponent performs the action being blocked, they must roll against the blocker’s result. If they succeed by at least one shift, they may perform the action. **OR
    • If any shifts are generated, the player may place a Border value of two on any border of the zone they are in.
    • If a border value already exists on the border, it may be incremented.
  • Maneuver: Player uses one of the Maneuver Skills to perform an action or place a taggable Aspect on an opponent or Zone. Resisted with Defensive Skills.
    • Player declares a target character.
    • Player rolls a Maneuver Skill, modified by range. Reduce shifts by one for each zone between the attacker and defender (Firearms, Might, Unarmed, and Weapons have a Range of 0 and may not function outside their Range. Certain Gear may increase effective Range).
    • If any shifts are generated, the player may add an Aspect to the target zone or character, and that Aspect may be free-tagged once in the course of the scene.
  • Move Other: Player uses one of the Attack Skills to move a defender a number of Zones equal to the attacker’s shifts of success. Resisted with Defensive Skills and Borders.
    • Player declares a target character.
    • Player rolls an Attack Skill, modified by range. Reduce shifts by one for each zone between the attacker and defender (Firearms, Might, Unarmed, and Weapons have a Range of 0 and may not function outside their Range. Certain Gear may increase effective Range).
    • If the attacker has shifts, they may move the defender that many zones.
    • If the attacker fails their roll by three or more (gets three or more negative shifts), the defender gets Spin.
Physical Conflict
  • Attack Skills: Firearms, Might, Unarmed, Weapons
  • Defensive Skills: Athletics, Unarmed, Weapons
  • Maneuver Skills: Demolitions, Endurance, Medicine, Might, Sleight of Hand, Stealth, Survival, Tactics
  • Move Skills: Athletics, Drive, Pilot
Social Conflict
  • Attack Skills: Deceit, Empathy, Intimidation, Rapport
  • Defensive Skills: Deceit, Empathy, Resolve
  • Maneuver Skills: Academics, Art, Contacting, Cultures, Leadership, Resources, Science
  • Move Skills: Deceit, Rapport
Access Conflict
  • Attack Skills: Demolitions, Might, Security
  • Defensive Skills: Computers, Endurance, Engineering, Security
  • Maneuver Skills: Computers, Engineering, Might, Sleight of Hand
  • Move Skills: Computers, Engineering, Security
Race Conflict
  • Attack Skills: Athletics, Drive, Pilot, Stealth
  • Defensive Skills: Alertness, Athletics, Drive, Pilot, Stealth
  • Maneuver Skills: Engineering, Firearms, Sleight of Hand, Unarmed, Weapons
  • Move Skills: Athletics, Drive, Pilot, Stealth
Repair Conflict
  • Attack Skills: Computers, Engineering, Medicine
  • Defensive Skills: Computers, Engineering, Science, Medicine
  • Maneuver Skills: Academics, Empathy, Resources, Sleight of Hand, Security, Survival
  • Move Skills: Computers, Engineering, Medicine, Resources
Research Conflict
  • Attack Skills: Academics, Art, Computers, Investigation
  • Defensive Skills: Academics, Art, Science
  • Maneuver Skills: Art, Computers, Cultures, Engineering, Medicine, Science
  • Move Skills: Academics, Computers, Investigation

Example Maneuvers:

Blinding

  • Whether it’s throwing sand in someone’s eyes, spraying someone with a harsh chemical or tossing a can of paint in his face, the goal is the same: keep him from being able to see. This likely involves the attacker rolling Weapons and the defender rolling Athletics, with the maneuver succeeding if the attacker gets at least one shift. A successful maneuver puts the aspect “Blinded” on the target, which may be compelled to add to the defense of their target, or to cause them to change the subject or direction of an action. It can’t force them to take an action they don’t want to (so a blinded character can’t be compelled to walk off a cliff if the character is not moving around).

Disarming

  • A successful disarm maneuver forces the target to drop his weapon or otherwise renders the weapon temporarily useless. The target must either spend an action to become re-armed, or pick up the weapon as a supplemental action. A supplemental action is normally a -1 penalty to the main action, but when a disarm maneuver is used, the shifts on the maneuver increase the penalty. For example, if the disarm attempt succeeds with three shifts, when the target tries to recover his weapon, he’ll be at -4 (-1 for the usual penalty, plus an additional -3) to his action that exchange – essentially the disarm maneuver has resulted in a block. His defensive rolls are not directly affected by this penalty, but they are indirectly affected; without a weapon in hand, he can’t use the Weapons skill to defend (Athletics and Fists are still options).

Indirect Attacks

  • Sometimes a character wants to do something like push a stack of boxes down on an opponent, or scatter marbles across the floor to trip him up. While this can potentially be an attack, it is usually meant as an inconvenience. If it’s an attack, it’s treated like any other attack. If it’s an inconvenience, the attacker has two options. The first option is to make an opposed roll (such as Might to knock over the bookcase versus Athletics to dodge) and generate at least one shift, allowing a temporary aspect (such as “Pinned”) to be placed on the target. The other option is to create a block (such as using Might to knock over the bookcase, with the value of the roll representing the block strength created by the scattered books, causing an opponent to have to roll Athletics in order to move through the mess).

Carrying

  • When the character carries something heavy, the penalty for a supplemental action is increased by the weight factor of the target (see page XX) for each zone he moves.

Example Move Other actions

Pushing

  • Pushing a target requires a successful attack (usually Fists or Might) and must generate a number of shifts equal to the weight of the target +1 for each zone the target will be pushed (the +1 is basically the usual -1 for moving). While a throw or knockback moves the target to a different zone, a push moves both the target and the acting character into the destination. Because of this, the “cost” in shifts for pushing remains flat, while the cost for body-throwing and knockback increases over distance (see below). Any applicable border conditions affect the roll to push.

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Throw or Knockback

  • It’s possible for a character to knock something or someone away from himself, without moving. Knockback covers any maneuver that can accomplish this, including throws. To knock something back one zone requires the maneuver have a success of 1 plus the weight factor of the target (a normal person has a weight factor of 2, see page XX)). Each additional zone costs as much as the previous zone did, plus one, so that the cost increases dramatically over distance. h1. Your title here…

Conflicts and Resolution

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